An Investigation into Eating Behaviour and Personality

About this study

Which facets of impulsivity differentiate primary school children at high-risk of developing problematic eating from low-risk peers? This project will examine the relationship between reward sensitivity, impulsivity and food addiction in children. This study will involve parents of primary school-aged children (ages 4-12) completing various measures on personality, eating behaviour, food preferences, parenting style, degree of conflict and cohesion and demographic information. The relationship between these factors and food addiction will be analysed via Multiple Regression Analyses, specifically moderation and mediation via PROCESS.

 The survey is split into two parts:

1) Prevalence rates for food addiction and facets of personality, mainly reward sensitivity and impulsivity.

2) Those who have children aged 4-12 years will be invited to continue a longer survey, in which each parent will complete measures of family functioning, parenting styles, and measures of food addiction, reward sensitivity and impulsivity for each of their children within the appropriate age range (4-12, primary school-aged children in Australia).

Research TeamAimee Maxwell PhD Candidate Clinical Psychology, Dr Natalie Loxton
InstitutionGriffith University
CountryAustralia
Ethics Approval Number2018/205
Funding SourceGriffith Graduate Research School
Project Start Date15 March 2018
Project End Date1 September 2018
ParticipantsWe are looking to recruit Australian adults over the age of 18. Participants who identify as either 1) not having children in the appropriate age range, or 2) reside overseas will form the prevalence data for the relationship between food addiction and reward sensitivity and impulsivity. Australian parents with children aged 4-12 years are the primary analysis group.
Whats InvolvedParticipants who form the prevalence data will complete a shorter survey, which will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Those who have children aged 4-12 years will be invited to continue a longer survey, which will take no longer than 45 minutes to complete. To thank participants for their time, they will have the opportunity to enter into a prize draw to win one (1) of ten (1) $50 Coles-Myer vouchers.
LocationOnline

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Family work in anorexia nervosa: A qualitative study of carers' experiences of two methods of family intervention

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